Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hollyhock House

Hollyhock House Living Room

Hollyhock House Living Room

In February, the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Hollyhock House — an iconic architectural masterpiece -— was reopened, in the heart of the vibrant, artistic, cultural, and recreational Barnsdall Park.

A significant part of Los Angeles’ storied architectural history, Hollyhock House -— a National Historic Landmark — was one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s magnificent masterpieces marking his first foray into architecture in Los Angeles. Hollyhock House boasts a lyrical and poetic style of architecture, “California Romanza,” or “freedom to make one’s own form,” which complements L.A.’s significance as a trendsetter in the arts and architecture space. Underscoring its importance as one of the world’s architectural gems, Hollyhock House is now among a group of ten Frank Lloyd Wright buildings that are the first works of modern architecture nominated by the United States to the United Nation’s Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage List.

“Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hollyhock House is a crown jewel of Los Angeles architecture,” said Mayor Eric Garcetti. “Restoring this landmark to its original glory is a great example of how the city can preserve its unique history while providing Angelenos access to art in everyday places.”

The storied history of Hollyhock House begins with Aline Barnsdall, a Pennsylvanian oil heiress interested in producing theater in her own venue. Purchasing a 36-acre site in Hollywood known as Olive Hill in 1919, Barnsdall commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to build a theater where she could produce avant-garde plays. Soon after, the project morphed into a performing arts complex that included her residence.

A philanthropist, art collector, political radical, and single parent, Barnsdall deeded the land now known as Barnsdall Park and its Frank Lloyd Wright designed structures as a permanent home for the appreciation of art and architecture to the City of Los Angeles in 1927.

Named for Barnsdall’s favorite flower, the Hollyhock is incorporated throughout the design scheme of the residence. The recently completed restoration is an important historical revelation for first-time visitors and regulars alike. Visitors will be able to see and experience the house in much of its original splendor. Floors, windows, doors, decorative molding, and long-forgotten paint colors have been recreated with utmost attention to detail.

Hollyhock House features self-guided “Walk Wright In” tours on Thursdays through Sundays from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. for a fee of $7 for adults, $3 for students and seniors with identification, and $3 for children under 12 when accompanied by a paying adult. Special arrangements may be made for docent-led tours, group tours, guided tours, and other engagements by calling 323.913.4031.

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